“Life is shit, but I learned to live with it”: an excerpt from a book about Janis Joplin, who perished in the abyss of drugs, loneliness and pain

“Life is shit, but I learned to live with it”: an excerpt from a book about Janis Joplin, who perished in the abyss of drugs, loneliness and pain

13.09.2022 0 By admin

After finishing her journey on the Festival Express, Janice flew to Seattle. She spent July 4, 1970, exploding fireworks outside the Edgewater Inn where she was staying. She did not seem depressed, but at the same time she foresaw her early death, thinking that she would live only a few more years, if she could.

She freed her life from everything except music, sex and alcohol, and this began to seem not enough to live on. She struggled without faith, hope, friends, or even any support group. Linda left her because of the drugs, and now Janice, trying to stay clean, avoided Sunshine and Peggy and her other drug-addicted buddies. So she was left alone.

AA founder Bill Wilson recognized the danger of the vacuum created when an alcoholic or drug addict gives up his old way of life. In his view, daily A.A. meetings provide an opportunity to make new, non-threatening friends, replacing old dysfunctional relationships. All new members of the program are encouraged to join the community immediately to avoid relapse. The rehabs Janice has attended may be good for just quitting, but they don’t offer the kind of ongoing personal growth and sober fellowship that you find in AA or NA (Narcotics Anonymous) meetings.